TAKE 2: Greg has COVID, & what you might’ve missed this week in Utah politics



Take 2 host Heidi Hatch is joined by former Utah House Speaker Greg Hughes and Maura Carabello, founder of the Exoro Group, for this week’s Take 2 podcast.

Hughes joins remotely as he is in quarantine with COVID-19.

This week in the Utah Legislature:

  • The Utah pioneer license plate: It’s been panned on social media. Do the people of Utah need it or want it?
  • Budget: Lawmakers unveil $2.26 billion transportation and construction package with $1.4 billion in bonds for transit and construction projects. Senate Republicans are not convinced borrowing such a large amount of money is prudent.

“In a year when we’re flush with cash, you have to ask whether it makes sense to bond right now,” said Assistant Senate Majority Whip Kirk Cullimore (R-Sandy).

  • Senate Bill 205: Is Dan McCay trying to gut “count my vote?”
  • House Bill 388: Should 16-year-olds be able to vote in school board elections?
  • The death of the transgender athlete bill
  • Changing the name of Dixie State University: Will it happen?
  • Where are we on police reform?

Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill is praising a bill moving through the legislature that would define when police should not use deadly force. House Bill 237, sponsored by Rep. Jen Dailey-Provost (D-Salt Lake City), would specify that officers should not use deadly force on an individual who is suicidal and does not pose a threat to anyone else.

  • Women’s Bills: Maura has a whole list of what we didn’t accomplish.
  • House Bill 143 passes, meaning Utah will no longer suspend driver’s licenses for unpaid court debt
  • Minimum wage: A bill that would incrementally increase Utah’s minimum wage to a peak of $15 an hour by July 2026 stalled in a House committee on Thursday. Republicans worried it would kill jobs and hurt the economy prevailed over Democrats who said it would help lift people out of poverty. Is this the right place for the conversation or should this be a national issue?

Developmental milestones for 3-year-old children



By the time your baby is 3-years-old, he or she should be able to do a variety of new things such as dressing themselves and carrying on a simple conversation.

Jade Elliott spoke with Carrie Martinez, Utah Department of Health, to discuss the important milestones your child should reach by 3-years-old and tools to help parents on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast.

Download & Subscribe on Apple Podcasts

Want to listen on another platform? Click here.

Social and Emotional

  • Copies adults and friends
  •  Shows affection for friends without prompting
  •  Takes turns in games
  • Shows concern for crying friend
  • Understands the idea of “mine” and “his” or “hers”
  • Shows a wide range of emotions
  • Separates easily from mom and dad
  •  May get upset with major changes in routine
  •  Dresses and undresses self

Language/Communication

  •  Follows instructions with 2 or 3 steps
  • Can name most familiar things
  • Understands words like “in,” “on,” and “under”
  • Says first name, age, and sex
  •  Names a friend
  •  Says words like “I,” “me,” “we,” and “you” and some plurals (cars, dogs, cats)
  • Talks well enough for strangers to understand most of the time
  •  Carries on a conversation using 2 to 3 sentences

Cognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving)

  • Can work toys with buttons, levers, and moving parts
  •  Plays make-believe with dolls, animals, and people
  •  Does puzzles with 3 or 4 pieces
  • Understands what “two” means
  • Copies a circle with pencil or crayon
  •  Turns book pages one at a time
  •  Builds towers of more than 6 blocks
  •  Screws and unscrews jar lids or turns door handle

Movement/Physical Development

  •  Climbs well
  •  Runs easily
  • Pedals a tricycle (3-wheel bike)
  •  Walks up and down stairs, one foot on each step

What do you do if your baby is not meeting these milestones?

Video Examples 3 year old:

Can parents get their baby on back on track on their own, or is this something they need a professional for?

Most of the time, children get the developmental skills they need when they are given opportunities to practice. Parents play a huge role in their child’s development, and often can help their child right away. For example, if your child’s screening showed a delay in language, you help your child right away, just by practicing this area of development.

However, sometimes your child may need professional intervention. In these situations, it’s best to work with your healthcare or childcare provider to get resources or referrals to professional agencies who are trained to help your child reach their developmental milestone needs.

The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.


PODCAST: Take 2 — Transgender bills, consent in sex education, governor’s powers



Host Heidi Hatch welcomes guests Maura Carabello and Greg Hughes to talk about the political issues impacting the state of Utah.

The tackle a variety of issues including a transgender sports bill aimed at eliminating transgender athletes from girls high school sports in Utah.

Another bill would require Utah students to learn about consent, coercion and sexual violence prevention behavior narrowly moved past its committee to head the larger legislative body.

Other topics the trio discusses includes a bill to limit Utah’s governor’s powers in a time of crisis, a rioting bill, Jason Chaffetz, new jobs for Ben McAdams and words from Rep. Burgess Owens about reparations for Black Americans.


Developmental milestones for 24 month old children



By the time your baby is 24 months old, he or she should be showing more independence and saying basic sentences.

Jade Elliott spoke with Carrie Martinez, Utah Department of Health, to discuss the important milestones your child should reach by 24 months old and tools to help parents on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast.

Download & Subscribe on Apple Podcasts

Want to listen on another platform? Click here.

Social and Emotional

  • Copies others, especially adults and older children
  • Gets excited when with other children
  • Shows more and more independence
  •  Shows defiant behavior (doing what he has been told not to)
  • Plays mainly beside other children, but is beginning to include other children, such as in chase games

Language/Communication

  • Points to things or pictures when they are named
  • Knows names of familiar people and body parts
  • Says sentences with 2 to 4 words
  • Follows simple instructions
  •  Repeats words overheard in conversation
  • Points to things in a book

Cognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving)

  •  Finds things even when hidden under two or three covers
  • Begins to sort shapes and colors
  •  Completes sentences and rhymes in familiar books
  • Plays simple make-believe games
  •  Builds towers of 4 or more blocks
  • Might use one hand more than the other
  • Follows a two-step instruction such as “Pick up your shoes and put them in the closet.”
  •  Names items in a picture book such as a cat, bird, or dog

Movement/Physical Development

  •  Stands on tiptoe
  • Kicks a ball
  • Begins to run
  • Climbs onto and down from furniture without help
  • Walks up and down stairs holding on
  • Throws ball overhand
  • Makes or copies straight lines and circle

What do you do if your baby is not meeting these milestones?

Video examples 24 months:

Can parents get their baby on back on track on their own, or is this something they need a professional for?

Most of the time, children get the developmental skills they need when they are given opportunities to practice. Parents play a huge role in their child’s development, and often can help their child right away. For example, if your child’s screening showed a delay in language, you help your child right away, just by practicing this area of development.

However, sometimes your child may need professional intervention. In these situations, it’s best to work with your healthcare or childcare provider to get resources or referrals to professional agencies who are trained to help your child reach their developmental milestone needs.

The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.


PODCAST: Take 2 – No-knock warrants, Paris Hilton visits Utah and tax breaks



KUTV’s Heidi Hatch hosts former Speaker of the House Greg Hughes and Maura Carabello of the Exoro Group in a new episode of Take 2.

The trio discuss topics that include:

No Knock warrants ban moves forward:

Paris Hilton testifies on Utah’s Capitol Hill: Paris Hilton appeared at a Utah legislative committee hearing Monday afternoon to throw her support behind a bill that would impose additional regulations on residential youth treatment centers and other congregate care programs.

Utah Tax break? We have billions in the bank. Do we save it for a rainy day or give the people a little of their own money back?

Utah does not need Federal stimulus? Take the money because everyone else is, or be happy we are doing well and so no thanks.

Transgender Girls in sports: A House committee voted Thursday to pass a measure seeking to stop transgender athletes from participating in girl’s sports at Utah public schools.

Should students get mental health days? A bill seeking to make mental health an excusable reason for students to miss school unanimously passed out of a senate committee Wednesday.

Trump Impeachment Trial part 2: Utahn’s making headlines

  • Mitt Romney and Mike Lee split votes.
  • Surveillance shows Romney being told to turn around by Capitol Police officer.
  • Mike Lee demands the record be stricken on statement attributed to him.
  • Mike Lee meets with Trump lawyers to talk strategy ahead of Friday case

 


18 month old developmental milestones



By the time your baby is 18 months old, he or she should be able to do a variety of new things such as walking and use a spoon.

Jade Elliott spoke with Carrie Martinez, Utah Department of Health, to discuss the important milestones your child should reach by 18 months old and tools to help parents on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast.

Download & Subscribe on Apple Podcasts

Want to listen on another platform? Click here.

Social and Emotional

  • Likes to hand things to others as play
  • May have temper tantrums
  • May be afraid of strangers
  •  Shows affection to familiar people
  • Plays simple pretend, such as feeding a doll
  •  May cling to caregivers in new situations
  • Points to show others something interesting
  • Explores alone but with parent close by

Language/Communication

  • Says several single words
  • Says and shakes head “no”
  • Points to show someone what he wants

Cognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving)

  •  Knows what ordinary things are for; for example, telephone, brush, spoon
  • Points to get the attention of others
  • Shows interest in a doll or stuffed animal by pretending to feed
  • Points to one body part
  • Scribbles on his own
  • Can follow 1-step verbal commands without any gestures; for example, sits when you say “sit down”

Movement/Physical Development

  • Walks alone
  • May walk up steps and run
  •  Pulls toys while walking
  • Can help undress herself
  • Drinks from a cup
  • Eats with a spoon

What do you do if your baby is not meeting these milestones?

Video Resources for 18 months:

Can parents get their baby on back on track on their own, or is this something they need a professional for?

Most of the time, children get the developmental skills they need when they are given opportunities to practice. Parents play a huge role in their child’s development, and often can help their child right away. For example, if your child’s screening showed a delay in language, you help your child right away, just by practicing this area of development.

However, sometimes your child may need professional intervention. In these situations, it’s best to work with your healthcare or childcare provider to get resources or referrals to professional agencies who are trained to help your child reach their developmental milestone needs.

The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.


Take 2: Biden’s $1.9 trillion COVID relief plan, Romney’s Family Security Act



Take 2 host Heidi Hatch is joined by former Speaker of the House Greg Hughes and political consultant Scott Howell in a new episode.

The big topic of discussion is President Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion stimulus bill. Early Friday, the Senate approved a measure that would let Democrats muscle Biden’s coronavirus relief plan through the chamber without Republican support. Vice President Kamala Harris was in the chair to cast the tie-breaking vote — her first.

Other topics discussed include:

  • Sen. Mitt Romney’s Family Security ACT proposal to be added on to stimulus package: Romney released the Family Security Act on Thursday — which the senator plans to propose as an amendment included with the Democrats’ stimulus package. It would provide families up to $3,000 a year in financial support per child ages 6 to 17 and up to $4,200 a year for infants to age 6. Americans expecting a child would be able to start applying for the monthly benefit four months prior to their due date.
  • Student loan crisis: Proposed relief with $50K student loan forgiveness.

UTAH LEGISLATURE:

  • Catfishing Bill: The House Judiciary Committee unanimously voted Thursday afternoon to move forward with a bill intended to protect people who are impersonated online. House Bill 239, sponsored by Rep. Karianne Lisonbee (R-Clearfield), would criminalize the impersonation of someone else on the internet to harm, intimidate, or threaten.
  • After a record number of police shootings in 2020, police reform bills face the first test in Utah Legislature. House Bill 84, sponsored by Rep. Angela Romero (D-Salt Lake City), would require law enforcement agencies to report data regarding use-of-force incidents to the Bureau of Criminal Identification.
  • House Bill 162, sponsored by Rep Romero would require officers’ annual training to include a substantial focus on “mental health and other crisis intervention responses, arrest control, and de-escalation training.”
  • Senate Bill 38, sponsored by Sen. Daniel Thatcher (R-West Valley), would tighten the certification and training requirements for police dogs and their handlers. That bill passed the Senate and is awaiting action in the House of Representatives.
  • Senate Bill 13, sponsored by Sen. Jani Iwamoto (D-Salt Lake City), would require providing information about officers under certain investigations to POST. It would also require providing information about officers to prospective employers if asked. That bill passed a Senate committee last week.

COVID-19 and pregnancy



COVID-19 is a real threat to anybody, including pregnant women. Pregnant women are at an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19 and death, compared to non-pregnant people. Additionally, pregnant women with COVID-19 might be at increased risk for other adverse outcomes, such as preterm birth (delivering the baby earlier than 37 weeks).

Jade Elliott spoke with Sean Esplin, MD, Sr. Medical Director, Women’s Health, Intermountain Healthcare, to discuss COVID-19 and how it impacts pregnant women on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast.

Download & Subscribe on Apple Podcasts

Want to listen on another platform? Click here.

What is the best way to protect yourself and to help reduce the spread of COVID-19?

Expectant mothers should follow CDC guidelines around mask wearing, social gathering and hand hygiene.

1. Limit interactions with people who might have been exposed to or who might be infected with COVID-19, including people within your household, as much as possible.

2. Take steps to prevent getting COVID-19 when you do interact with others.

3. Wear a mask, especially when you cannot keep distance from other people. Avoid others who are not wearing masks or ask others around you to wear a mask.

4. Stay at least 6 feet away from others outside your household.

5. Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.

6. Avoid activities where taking these steps might be difficult.

Why can it be difficult for pregnant women to distinguish between COVID-19 symptoms and pregnancy symptoms?

Pregnant women might confuse COVID-19 symptoms with the more traditional symptoms experienced during pregnancy.

People can have COVID-19 and actually be pretty sick and not know it. They can be unaware of how short of breath they actually are, or how low their oxygen levels are. During pregnancy, it’s really important to keep those oxygen levels high because if mom’s oxygen is low, then the baby’s oxygen level is even lower.

What risks are there for pregnant women if they get COVID-19?

Those with coronavirus are at higher risk for blood clots; so too are pregnant women. That’s why medication is now used to prevent blood clots in pregnant women.

Can COVID-19 affect your unborn baby?

Although the virus doesn’t cross the placenta, and get to the baby, it can get to the interface between the placenta and the lining of the uterus, where it can cause some changes in the blood vessels that changes how much oxygen and food and fluid are getting to the baby across the placenta. It can make it so that the placenta doesn’t really work as well in some women. It can age the placenta. Which may mean some pregnant women with COVID-19 may need to deliver their baby early.

What if I’m pregnant and get exposed to someone with COVID-19?

Get tested. Intermountain Healthcare recommends you get tested seven days after exposure. If someone you live with has COVID-19 have them isolate in a certain area of your home and use a separate bathroom if possible. Wear a mask, social distance and practice good hand hygiene and/or wear gloves when caring for them or handling their dishes or laundry. Have the sick person clean the areas they are using if they are well enough to do so.

What if I have COVID-19 when it’s time to deliver my baby?

Prior to giving birth, Intermountain asks that our patients are tested for COVID-19. This can be done a few days before your due date. Or if you go into labor early or need to be induced early, we can do a rapid COVID-19 test when you arrive at the hospital.

Our hospitals and labor and delivery caregivers are prepared to care for you if you are COVID-19 positive and will help inform you about special precautions that are taken about wearing a mask or personal protective equipment.

What if I have COVID-19 and want to nurse my baby?

Current evidence suggests that breast milk is not likely to spread the virus to babies. You and your healthcare provider can help decide whether and how to start or continue breastfeeding. Breast milk provides protection against many illnesses and is the best source of nutrition for most babies.

If you have COVID-19 and choose to breastfeed follow these guidelines:

  • Wash your hands before breastfeeding
  •  Wear a mask while breastfeeding and whenever you are within six feet of your baby.

If you have COVID-19 and choose to express breast milk

  •  Use your own breast pump, if possible.
  • Wear a mask during expression.
  •  Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds before touching any pump or bottle parts, and before expressing breast milk.
  •  Follow recommendations for proper pump cleaning after each use. Clean all parts of the pump that come into contact with breast milk.
  •  Consider having a healthy caregiver who does not have COVID-19, is not at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19, and is living in the same home feed the expressed breast milk to the baby.
  •  Any caregiver feeding the baby should wear a mask when caring for the baby for the entire time you are in isolation and during their own quarantine period after you complete isolation.

How can I keep my newborn baby safe from COVID-19?

  • Limit visitors to see your new baby

Before allowing or inviting visitors into your home or near your baby, consider the risk of COVID-19 to yourself, your baby, people who live with you, and visitors.

  • Bringing people who do not live with you into your home can increase the risk of spreading COVID-19. Some people without symptoms can spread the virus.
  • Limit in-person gatherings and consider other options, like celebrating virtually, for people who want to see your new baby.
  • If you do plan to have in-person visits, ask guests to stay home if they are sick and ask them to stay six feet away from you and your baby, wear a mask, and wash their hands when visiting your home.
  •  Ask your childcare program about the plans they have in place to protect your baby, family, and their staff from COVID-19.

What are the possible signs and symptoms of COVID-19 infection among babies?

Most babies who test positive for COVID-19 have mild or no symptoms. Severe illness in babies has been reported but appears to be rare. Babies with underlying medical conditions and babies born premature (earlier than 37 weeks) might be at higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19.

Reported signs among newborns with COVID-19 include:

  • fever
  • lethargy (being overly tired or inactive)
  • runny nose
  • cough
  • vomiting
  •  diarrhea
  •  poor feeding
  •  increased work of breathing or shallow breathing

If your baby develops symptoms or you think your baby may have been exposed to COVID-19, get in touch with your baby’s healthcare provider within 24 hours and follow steps for caring for children with COVID-19.

If your baby has COVID-19 emergency warning signs (such as trouble breathing), seek emergency care immediately. Call 911.

Where can women go for more information about pregnancy and COVID-19?

CDC coronavirus and pregnancy

https://www.acog.org/clinical/clinical-guidance/practice-advisory/articles/2020/03/novel-coronavirus-2019

The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.


PODCAST: Take 2 – Utah legislature, AG Reyes impeachment hearing and more



KUTV’s Heidi Hatch hosts former Speaker of the House Greg Hughes and Maura Carabello of the Exoro Group in a new episode of Take 2. 

The panel dived into the Utah Legislative Session and the bills that will impact you:

Stalking Bill: A bill proposing changes to Utah’s stalking code was supported by the House Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice Committee, but victim advocates argue the change would make it harder for victims to get protection.https://kutv.com/news/local/legislator-defends-change-to-utahs-stalking-code-opposed-by-victim-advocates

In-person participation is back and why it matters: They were initially online.

Concealed Carry Permit restrictions: The bill in the Utah Legislature that would allow adults to carry a concealed firearm in public without a permit has cleared the House of Representatives and now moves to the Senate.

Blow-dry bar licenses: Blow dryers and curling irons are igniting a firestorm of debate on Utah’s Capitol Hill.

Bill to stop people from party swapping: Last summer, nearly 80,000 people registered as Republicans in Utah so they could vote in that party’s primary for governor.

AG Sean Reyes Impeachment hearing: Rep. Andrew Stoddard says an investigation is the only way to get details on Reyes’ post-election efforts on behalf of Trump must happen.

Utah Vaccination plans to allow people to get in line using the honor system: Future vaccine groups in Utah — who could be getting shots as early as March — will be determined by age and underlying health conditions.


Should you get the COVID-19 vaccine if you’re pregnant?



If you’re pregnant, the best thing is to get more information so you can evaluate the risks and benefits of getting or not getting the COVID-19 vaccine. People are worried because we don’t have a lot of experience and data about pregnant women and the type of vaccine being used for the COVID-19 vaccine. Pregnant women want to be careful and might be nervous about the vaccine.

Jade Elliott spoke with Sean Esplin, MD, Sr. Medical Director, Women’s Health, Intermountain Healthcare about the vaccine and what pregnant women should know.

Download & Subscribe on Apple Podcasts

Want to listen on another platform? Click here.

What information can help pregnant women decide if they should get the COVID-19 vaccine?

However, national organizations such as the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine recommend that each person consider their own potential risk factors and discuss them with their OB provider. They agree that in most cases there is no reason for pregnant women to not receive the vaccine.

What factors might influence a pregnant woman’s decision to get the COVID-19 vaccine?

You’ll want to evaluate your own risk of contracting COVID-19. Talking with your OB provider can help you further evaluate your risk. You are at higher risk if you have lots of contact with people outside your home. For example, if you are a teacher or healthcare worker. You are also at more risk of getting COVID-19 if you are pregnant and over age 35 or are overweight, or have other medical conditions, or smoke or belong to a minority groups. Generally, the vaccine makes sense for women in those groups.

You’ll also want to look at the rate of COVID-19 in your local community. Our positivity rates in Utah are high right now. Most pregnant women in Utah communities should opt to have the vaccine when it’s available.

When people who are pregnant get COVID-19 they have a slightly higher risk of ending up in the ICU and having a severe case COVID-19. It makes sense to protect yourself. The COVID-19 vaccine is a critical part of how we end this pandemic. We want as many people to get the vaccine as they can.

If you’ve had a severe reaction to another vaccine you’ll want to talk about the risks and benefits of the vaccine with your OB provider.

My patients who are pregnant have a wide spectrum of feelings about the vaccine. Some are biased by misinformation they’ve heard about vaccines. For years, we’ve encouraged pregnant women to take other vaccines, such as for the flu, Tdap, etc.

Were pregnant women included in the U.S. COVID-19 vaccine trials?

About 50 pregnant women were included in the U.S. trials for COVID-19 either because they didn’t know they were pregnant or they became pregnant after getting the first dose of the vaccine. Typically, pregnant women are not included in trials because it adds another variable and that can make it more difficult to separate out the results. The pregnant women in the trials didn’t have any unexpected side effects or problems. The vaccine seemed to work as effectively as in non-pregnant women.

Does it matter what trimester of your pregnancy you are in when you get the vaccine?

There is no evidence that women in their first or second trimester are at higher risk if they get the vaccine. It is OK to get pregnant after getting vaccine.

What type of vaccine is the COVID-19 vaccine? And how does it work?

This is an MRNA vaccine. Some other types of vaccines are made with a virus that has been killed. The COVID-19 vaccine contains pieces of MRNA, which is basically a recipe for making a protein. It is a very effective way to do a vaccine. It should be safe in pregnancy. It won’t cross the placenta or change MRNA code. It should protect both mom and baby.

Will pregnant women who get the vaccine be studied?

Future studies of the COVID-19 vaccine will include pregnant women. National registries are keeping track of data on pregnant women. We recommend pregnant women now be included in these trials and they continue to collect data.

What about the side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine?

If you get the vaccine, there will be side effects. That’s normal and expected and it’s a sign the vaccine is working. Side effects include a sore arm, body aches, fever, fatigue, headache. The vaccines currently available are 95 percent effective if you get both doses. The efficacy is much more pronounced after the second dose. Be sure to get the second dose.

If you get the vaccine do you still need to wear a mask and practice social distancing and good hand hygiene?

Yes. Getting the vaccine means you have a lower chance of getting the virus, but you can still get the virus. Getting the vaccine also means if you get the virus, your case is likely to be milder than if you didn’t get the vaccine. So wearing masks and practicing social distancing and good hand hygiene will further reduce your risk of getting COVID-19 and other viruses such as the flu or colds as well.

What are the medical experts recommending for pregnant women?

There are different recommendations from different organizations.

National organizations such as the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine recommend each person consider their own potential risk factors and discuss them with their OB provider. They agree in most cases there is no reason for pregnant women to not receive the vaccine.

However, the World Health Organization recently announced it is not recommending the vaccine for pregnant women unless they are at high risk of exposure to COVID-19, for example if they are a healthcare worker.

However, in response to the WHO recommendation, ACOG and SMFM issued a joint statement yesterday affirming their guidance that both COVID-19 vaccines currently authorized in the U.S. should not be withheld from pregnant individuals who choose to receive the vaccine.

Where can women go for more information?

You can visit websites for the CDCAmerican College of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine.

The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.